Guide To Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Huntington Library


EL 26 A 13

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HOCCLEVE, REGIMENT OF PRINCES; LYDGATE
England, s. XVmed
Composite volume
I.
1. f. ii verso: [John Lydgate, A Prayer for King, Queen and People] Lord god preserue vnder þy mighty hande/ þe kynge þe qwene þe people and þis lande.
IMEV 1955.5. H. N. MacCracken, ed., The Minor Poems of John Lydgate. EETS es 107 (London 1911) pt. 1, p. 213, lines 6-7 only.
2. f. ii verso: [John Lydgate, Pageant of Knowledge] þe worlde so wyde þayre so remuable/ þe lytel man so lytel of stature…þat made is of þoes foure þis flitting/ May stidfast beo as here in his living.
IMEV 3504. H. N. MacCracken, ed., The Minor Poems of John Lydgate. EETS os 192 (London 1934) pt. 2, p. 730, stanza 23.
3. f. ii verso: [John Lydgate, Tyed with a Lyne, headed “Halsham”] þe more I go þe firþer I am behinde/ þe firþer behinde þe nerre my weyes eonde…Is þis fortune not I or infortune/ þaughe I go loose I tyed am with youre lune.
IMEV 3437. MacCracken, pt. 2, p. 832, stanza 1, and C. Brown, ed., Religious Lyrics of the XVth Century (Oxford 1939) 262-63, printing arts. 2 and 3 as “Halsham’s Ballad.”
4. ff. ii verso-iii: [Geoffrey Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde, headed “Gower”] A whestone is no karving instrument/ And yitte it makeþe sharp karving tholis…If þowe de so þy witte is wele bywared/ By his contrarye is every thing declared.
IMEV 3327. H. N. MacCracken, “More Odd Texts of Chaucer’s Troilus,” MLN 25 (1910) 126-27 from this manuscript; Troilus and Criseyde, Bk. 1, lines 631-637.
5. f. iii: [Geoffrey Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde, headed “Troyles”] If no love is o lord what fele I so/ And if love is what thing and what is he…þat from it comþe may to me savoury thenke/ For ay thrist I þe more þat I it drynke.
IMEV 1422.1. MacCracken, “More Odd Texts…,” p. 127 from this manuscript; Troilus and Criseyde, Bk. 1, lines 400-406, but attributed by MacCracken to Petrarch, because of the correspondence with the first 4 verses of his sonnet 132, “S’amor non è, che dunque è quel ch’io sento?/ Ma, s’egli è Amor, per Dio che cosa e quale?/ Se bona, ond’è l’effetto aspro mortale?/ Se ria, ond’è si dolce ogni tormento?” B. L. Ullman, “Petrarch Manuscripts in the United States,” IMU 5 (1962) 464 n. 82. D. Dutschke, Census of Petrarch Manuscripts in the United States (Padua 1986) n. 112.
6. f. iii: [John Walton, Boethius, headed “Boece”] As þat pouert causeþe soburnesse/ And feobulnesse enforceþe continence…þere is no more perayllous pestylence/ þane hye estate graunted vn to shrewes. To yowe Chaucier. [ff. iii verso-v verso, blank except for pen trials and ownership notes; see below]
IMEV 2820. M. Science, ed., Boethius: De Consolatione Philosophiae translated by John Walton, canon of Oseney. EETS os 170 (London 1927) 4, stanza 11.
7. ff. 1-12v: [John Lydgate, Daunce of Machabree] Verba translatoris, O see folkes harde herted as a stone/ Which to the world haue al your aduertence…Of her tunge I haue no suffisaunce/ Her corious metris In Inglissh to translate. Amen.
IMEV 2591. F. Warren, ed., with notes by B. White, The Dance of Death. EETS os 181 (London 1931) 2-76 from this manuscript representing Group A, and from London, Brit. Lib., Lansdowne 699 representing Group B.
8. f. 13r-v: [John Lydgate] A resoun of the Rammeshorne, Al right wisnesse dothe now procede/ Sitte crowned liche an Emperesse…Thus eche astate is gouerned yn sothenesse/ Conueied be lyne right as a rammeshorne.
IMEV 199. MacCracken, pt. 2, pp. 461-64 from this manuscript.
9. f. 14r-v: [John Lydgate] A sotel resoun of the Crabbe, This worlde is ful of stablenesse/ Ther is ther ynne no veriaunce…The heueneli signe maketh demonstraunce/ Right as the Crabbe gothe forewarde.
IMEV 3655. MacCracken, pt. 2, pp. 465-67 with some variants from this manuscript.
10. ff. 15-17: [John Lydgate] A resoun de Fallacia mundi, Considere welle with eueri circumstaunce/ Of what estate euer thowe be…Chastiseth the reuers & of wisdom dothe this/ Voideth ȝowre heryng from al that sey a mys. [f. 17v, blank]
IMEV 653. MacCracken, pt. 2, pp. 839-44 from this manuscript.
11. ff. 18-115: [Thomas Hoccleve, Regiment of Princes] Musyng vp on the restles besynes/ wiche that trowbli world hathe ay on honde…And if lust be to his magnyficence/ Do be thi reed his welthes shal witnesse. Iste liber constat [added probably by John Shirley:] Aluredo Corneburgh de Camera Regis.
IMEV 2229. F. J. Furnivall, ed., Hoccleve’s Works: The Regement of Princes. EETS es 72 (London 1897) 1-197, here including the usual marginal notes in Latin; on f. 28v, a space reserved for stanza 87; on f. 69v, line 2460, stanza 352, precedes lines 2458-2459; on f. 99v, stanza 659 copied between stanzas 654-655; because the 3 center bifolia of quires 9 and 10 are reversed (by a contemporary binder, since one set of signatures reflects the disorder), these folios should be read 58, 67-72, 65-66, 59-64, 73; the last stanza of the envoy not copied here. Text frequently corrected by erasure from marginal indications in crayon; corrector’s mark, “co[rrigitur?]” in crayon, e.g. ff. 49v, 73v, 91; marginal notes in ink, partially erased, e.g. ff. 17, 21v, 22. See M. C. Seymour, “The Manuscripts of Hoccleve’s Regiment of Princes,” Edinburgh Bibliographical Society Transactions 4 pt. 7 (1974) 289-90 for a description of EL 26 A 13 (mixing the 2 sets of foliation).
12. f. 115v: [added in a current hand] The weye vnto Rome and soo too Venyse and to Ierusalem…
Itinerary of 65 locations from Calais to Jerusalem, grouped under the headings “Flaundris,” “Braban,” “Ducheland,” “Lombard,” “Venysian,” “ylondys.”
II.
13. ff. 116-126v: [Joseph and Asenath] As I on hilly halkes logged me late/ Biside ny of a ladi sone was I war…þus endeth the storie of asneth to your remembrance/ My rude translacion I pray you tak hit with plesance.
IMEV 367. H. N. MacCracken, “The Storie of Asneth: An Unknown Middle English Translation of a Lost Latin Version,” Journal of English and German Philology 9 (1910) 224-62 from this manuscript.
14. ff. 126v-127: [“Untimely Death of a Fair Lady”] Ha cruell deth contrarious to creatures in kynde/ Ha deeth dispitous who may aduertise…Comely kynde and curteis in nobleye of nurture/ Vernant in alle vertu plesaunt and demure.
IMEV 2. MacCracken, “The Storie of Asneth…,” pp. 262-64 from this manuscript, treating it as the epilogue to art. 13. Brown, Religious Lyrics of the XVth Century, pp. 241-43 from this manuscript, as a separate item.
15. f. 127v: [added in a textura script] [H]enricus octavus dei gracia Anglie et Francie Rex…Cum nuper monasterium de Feversham in comitatu nostro kant. iam//
Beginning of a letter patent of Henry VIII regarding the monastery of Faversham in Kent; left unfinished.
Parchment, ff. ii (modern paper) + iv (contemporary parchment; the second paper flyleaf glued to the recto of the first parchment flyleaf) + 127 + i (contemporary parchment) + i (modern paper); 283 × 205 mm. I. ff. ii verso-v verso, one gathering of 4 leaves, written in a secretary script, with a couplet of verse and 5 stanzas copied on ff. ii verso-iii by John Shirley; ff. iii verso-iv, various names (see below), pen trials and sketches of a griffin and a grotesque; ff. iv verso-v, name and pressmark (see below); f. v verso, “bookplate” of John Shirley (see below). Main text, ff. 1-115, written space: 165 × 100 mm. 18 210(-10 after f. 17) 3-88 9-108 (3 center bifolia in these 2 quires exchanged from one quire to the other) 11-138 148(+9, 10). Catchwords in ornamented brown ink frames. Quire and leaf signatures in 2 contemporary systems: the first seems to be “ad hoc” symbols for the quires and roman numerals for the leaves, placed in the lower right corner; the second system uses a cross for the first quire, thereafter letters, with roman numerals for the leaves, placed in the center of the lower margin. That the “ad hoc” system preceded the letter system is shown by the matching “ad hoc” signatures on ff. 58, 67 and 68, on leaves which should be in the same quire (as required by the order of the text) but which are now misbound into quires 9 (f. 58 in position 1) and 10 (ff. 67, 68 in positions 2 and 3); the letter-system signatures on these leaves agree with the present misbinding (gi, hii and hiii respectively). On f. 61 (quire 9, position 4) is a different “ad hoc” signature, which presumably should have placed this leaf in quire 10 (as its text does), but with the letter-system signature of quire 9 (g iiii). 28 lines of verse on 36 rules (the extra at the bottom), frame ruled in ink on 3 sides (omitting the bottom) with horizontal rules in crayon; pricking present along the bounding lines of the text frame on ff. 80, 81. Written in a bastard anglicana. Opening initials, ff. 1 and 18, 5-line parted red and blue infilled with void leaf designs, and with cascade in red, blue and ink of text, ending in red flourishes; 3-line blue initials with void leaf infilling and red flourishes in the margins; unornamented 1-line initials alternating red and blue; paragraph marks and underlining in red. Corrector’s mark in lead on ff. 49v, 73v (last leaves of quires). Lower margins of quire 11 (ff. 82-89) repaired. II. ff. 116-127, written space: 200 × 115 mm. 18 24. 42 lines of verse, ruled in ink. Written in a textura script. 6- to 4-line initials in ink of text decorated with a man’s profile and tinted yellow; versals touched in yellow. On the back parchment flyleaf, ruled as pt. I with 3 bounding lines in ink (omitting the bottom line), but no horizontal lines, a rough sketch of a man with a sword in a costume of the time of Henry VIII. Recently (?) refoliated, omitting the front flyleaves; most printed references to this manuscript now off by 5. Bound, ca. 1840, in purple morocco, gold tooled with the Bridgewater crest stamped on front and back covers; marbled endpapers; gilt edges. Written in England in the middle of the fifteenth century. Partially (ff. ii verso-iii) copied by, and belonged to, John Shirley (ca. 1366-1456); his “bookplate” on f. v verso, “iesu mercy/ margarete & beautrice/ ma ioye M [or A? surmounted by a crown] Shirley.” See A. I. Doyle, “More Light on John Shirley,” Medium Aevum 30 (1961) 93-101, and, for a brief mention of manuscripts connected with Shirley, E. P. Hammond, English Verse between Chaucer and Surrey (Duke University Press 1927) 191-94. See also Troilus and Criseyde: Geoffrey Chaucer, a facsimile of Corpus Christi College Cambridge MS 61 with introductions by M. B. Parkes and E. Salter (Cambridge 1978) 10-11 with a plate reproducing Lydgate’s couplet on the King, Queen and People from 3 Shirley manuscripts (including EL 26 A 13, art. 1); A. I. Doyle, “English Books In and Out of Court from Edward III to Henry VII,” in English Court Culture in the Later Middle Ages, ed. V. J. Scattergood and J. W. Sherborne (London 1983) 175 n. 34 points out that the queen in Lydgate’s poem is Henry VI’s mother, Catherine, and so could be 1422-37. Another plate of Shirley’s hand in P. J. Croft, Autograph Poetry in the English Language (New York 1973) vol. 1, n. 2 from London, Brit. Lib., Add. 16165. Shirley probably filled in “Aluredo Corneburgh de Camera Regis” on f. 115; this leaf reproduced in Doyle, “English Books…,” pl. 17. Avery Cornburgh, whose name occurs in varying forms on f. iv (“aure kornbrou” or “awrese”) was a Yeoman of the Chamber to Edward IV; see A. R. Myers, The Household of Edward IV (Manchester 1959) 243, n. 60. He married Beatrice Lynne between 1459 and 1467; her sister, Margaret Lynne, had become Shirley’s second wife between 1421 and 1441. The names of Margaret and Beatrice are incorporated into Shirley’s “bookplate” on f. v verso; a sketch on f. iv of a griffin passant may refer to Lynne, another on the same page of a boar may refer to Cornburgh; see Doyle, “English Books…,” p. 177. Other fifteenth century notes include on ff. iii verso and iv verso, “Elyzabeth Gaynesford,” and on ff. iii verso and iv, “necolas gaynsford” (also spelled “gaynford”); this Nicholas Gaynsford may have been the Usher to the Chamber of Edward IV and his Queen; see J. C. Wedgwood and A. Holt, History of Parliament (London 1936-38) 1:368-69. On f. iii verso, “Ryght truste and welbeloued Suster J.P.” On back flyleaf verso, s. XVI, a note in an italic script listing the chapters of Hoccleve’s De Regimine Principum and a recipe in a secretary script. On f. v, pressmark “Z:/2./2.” in the hand of John Egerton (1622-86), 2nd Earl of Bridgewater, with the last number corrected to “10” at a later date, possibly by John Egerton (1646-1701), 3rd Earl of Bridgewater. Printed on a square yellow slip of paper glued to f. ii verso, “MSS. No. 4.” Acquired by Henry E. Huntington in 1917 with the Bridgewater Library (see pp. 5-7).
Secundo folio: [f. iii] Eschewe þou þat;; [f. 2] O ȝe that; [f. 117] For seven maidenes
Bibliography: De Ricci, 131-32.
Abbreviations
De Ricci
S. De Ricci, with the assistance of W. H. Wilson, Census of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the United States and Canada (New York 1935-37; index 1940)
EETS es
Early English Text Society extra series
EETS os
Early English Text Society original series
IMEV
C. Brown and R. H. Robbins, Index of Middle English Verse (New York 1943) and Supplement by R. H. Robbins and J. L. Cutler (Lexington 1965)
IMU
Italia medioevale e umanistica
MLN
Modern Language Notes

C. W. Dutschke with the assistance of R. H. Rouse et al., Guide to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Huntington Library (San Marino, 1989). Copyright 1989.
Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery, San Marino, California.
Electronic version encoded by Sharon K, Goetz, 2003.
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